FPWTF: Lauren McKinney

FPWTF: Lauren McKinney

One year ago I opened my closet door, thumbed through a hodgepodge of florals, ruffles, peplums, and plaids…

and realized that I didn’t love anything. 

My closet was packed, but I still found nothing to wear. 

I labored over each piece, attempting to create cohesion in a haphazard wardrobe that was built on fast fashion and end-of-the-year sales. With no knowledge of capsule wardrobes, I searched YouTube for “effortless fashion” and stumbled on Signe Hansen’s YouTube channel, “Useless.” Her methods were entirely revolutionary to me.

Was it really possible to be stylish and love my wardrobe without having an overflowing closet and a surplus of money? 

Consumerism’s grip on my wallet (and mind) told me no, but Signe’s videos told me otherwise. So I began the process of reinventing my wardrobe. 

One year later and I’ve sold almost everything I reluctantly wore and have funded my new capsule wardrobe almost entirely from those sales. Now I dress myself in no time, everything matches, and believe it or not, this smaller wardrobe has made me more creative and given me way more outfit options. 

The past year has totally flipped my fashion philosophy on its head. Creating a capsule wardrobe has honestly changed my life. It sounds dramatic, I know, but not only do I spend less money on clothes, I also understand the implications of everything I purchase. 

So, what is a capsule wardrobe? 

In short, my capsule wardrobe has three components: an all-year basics component, a seasonal component, and an all-year color scheme. I only keep/buy what I love so my closet is lean, and I like it that way. My basics stay in my closet all year, and I supplement them with two seasonal wardrobes–spring/summer and fall/winter. 

The basic and seasonal wardrobes, once put together, can create endless outfits. Because I follow a color scheme that I love, everything matches everything else. If you’re curious about creating your own capsule wardrobe, Signe Hansen has an entire video on how to start. 

My Fashion Philosophy: CFEE

I never even had a fashion philosophy before I started capsuling, but being intentional about how I shop forced me to create a fashion philosophy. I summarize my fashion philosophy in four words: classic, feminine, easy, and a touch of edge. And ultimately all of these words must nod to the ethical and sustainable

CLASSIC

Channeling Audrey Hepburn’s timeless style is easier than you think!

The concept of classic elegance is something I value so much. Why? Because it’s timeless while at the same time being eternally interesting. Some of the greatest style icons of the Western world dressed in beautifully tailored yet effortlessly simple pieces (think of Audrey Hepburn, Jane Birkin, Grace Kelly, and Princess Diana—I could go on). Today, I’m heavily inspired by the quintessential French woman, and whether or not she actually exists, the concept of having well-constructed pieces that transcend time is one that inspires my closet. 

Jeans, a button-down shirt, and a good pair of shoes will never ever get old.

FEMININE

French Girl Style We Can't get Enough Of - STYLE REPORT MAGAZINE

Much of today’s fashion is androgynous, which I honestly love on other people. It’s cool and Scandinavian. However, I find myself maintaining an air of femininity in my closet. This manifests in the form of flowing silk blouses, pearls, the occasional ruffle or floral print, and of course, pink—I’ll never stop wearing a beautiful pale pink.

Fashion blogger and YouTuber Audrey Coyne does a fabulous job of constructing feminine and timeless outfits. She’s shaped my closet so much. And who can ignore Jeanne Damas? She’s the epitome of French girl fashion.  

EASY

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Ease is essential in any wardrobe created with the intention to last. Whether or not I’m intentionally avoiding the piece, I find that if wearing it makes my life harder, I just won’t reach for it. The paradox is that a truly easy piece probably wasn’t easy to find (in that I couldn’t just walk into the mall and purchase whatever I saw). Ease and wearability post-purchase require research and intentionality pre-purchase. 

EDGE

The leo flats are out 🐆💥 similar (mainly ethical) options can be found by screenshotting this image and opening it in the @liketoknow.it…

Edge adds an element of interest in a wardrobe that is mostly built out of classic and feminine pieces. Edge keeps me modern. Simple things like wearing a pointy-toe boot, having jeans with a frayed hem and layering jewelry create a subtle coolness that complements the altogether softness of my wardrobe. Signe Hansen and Anine Bing are my edgy inspo. 

A Quick Note About Ethics and Sustainability in Fashion

This capsule wardrobe journey has shown me the importance of caring about where my clothes come from. The documentary The True Cost reveals that the textile industry is one of the most polluting industries in the world; it could easily be the least ethical industry as well. Caring about quality, the earth and people is something that I can accomplish based on where I shop. I’ve purchased 90 percent of my capsule wardrobe secondhand, and when I shop for new items, I always shop ethical brands first. I’m no expert in this, but every small decision makes a difference. 

So…

Building a wardrobe is an ongoing process, even a capsule wardrobe. However, capsuling has made getting dressed in the morning exponentially easier. I highly recommend checking out Signe Hansen’s YouTube channel. Now, I love putting outfits together, and I love talking about how transformative this process has been for me. Fashion doesn’t have to be hard.  

FPWTF: Anecia Ascalon

FPWTF: Anecia Ascalon

This series is called “Fashion Philosophies and Where to Find Them.” After spending time in many corners of the world, I constantly come back to how amazed I am at people’s ability to express themselves through something as simple as the fabric they wear. My contributors come from all over the world, and this is how they have shaped their own personal style as it relates to their identity. 


New Jersey native Anecia Ascalon draws her fashion inspiration from current trends, as well as some nostalgic fads. Here she is, pictured in a classy cream ensemble, perfect for any season.

I have always cared about the way I look. My appearance, and how others perceive it, has historically meant far too much for me.

Clothes help me feel confident. Wearing a black turtleneck, Levi’s, and a chic coat, I feel self-assured enough to slay my day.

Back to Basics

There are three main things that I value in clothes.

Number one? Projected maturity.

I want my outfit to convey that am, at least on some level, an adult. I might not have it all together, but I can certainly dress like I do. Dressing like the woman you want to be is a major step in becoming her.

Number two? A sense of modesty.

The balance between sexy and demure.

I want to look attractive, but not because of my body. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. But I personally feel more grown-up when I’m covered up.

I used to wear cleavage-baring outfits, which did make me feel attractive, yet was left consistently empty when I didn’t receive enough attention based on those looks. Now, I hope that my smile and personality can be what makes me most beautiful, all while looking physically put together.

The final, and maybe most important, value is effortlessness.

I don’t like thinking too deeply when putting together an outfit, and I don’t want to look like I’m trying too hard either.

My Closet

Sticking to a neutral palette and basic silhouettes helps. It’s easy, stops me from buying things I don’t need, and I don’t have to try and match colors together.

If something isn’t white, cream, beige, brown, grey, or black, I’m probably not going to buy it. 

The only exceptions to the rule are cute dresses or summer blouses that I can throw on with jeans.

A couple things I don’t like wearing are:

  • short dresses
  • colorful shorts
  • navy, red, orange, or purple
  • shoes that feel too chunky
  • anything with any kind of applique.

My Style Evolution

I get style inspiration mainly from Pinterest, my friends, and people I see out and about. Sometimes you don’t realize something is cute until you see it on someone else. I have also always loved the ’90s-esque look and will literally never stop wearing high-waisted jeans.

Overall, the main thing for me is confidence. If something makes me feel amazing, then I’m going to wear it.


For more of Anecia’s style, check out her absolutely aesthetic Instagram @aneciaascalon!

Be sure to subscribe to see more from this series! Looking forward to sharing these stories with you all.

FPWTF: Reagan Perritte

FPWTF: Reagan Perritte

This series is called “Fashion Philosophies and Where to Find Them.” After spending time in many corners of the world, I constantly come back to how amazed I am at people’s ability to express themselves through something as simple as the fabric they wear. My contributors come from all over the world, and this is how they have shaped their own personal style as it relates to their identity. 


There are few things I love more than new clothes. I’ve been that way my entire life. Growing up in the South, there is some strange obsession with appearance and looking your best all the time. The Southern woman tradition is rooted in pearls, seersucker and smocking. I wore lace socks and a big bow to my sixth grade graduation. I never wore pants to church, and I had a new outfit for almost every holiday and special occasion. 

When I moved to Baltimore, the style seemed so backward. It’s like it wasn’t a priority at all. Now, after living in Washington for the last eight years, the trends here are so different from what I grew up wearing. 

Back to My Roots

My love for fashion started early, and I believe I was directly influenced by my Auntie Kathe. She lived in California–a completely different style than I had ever seen. When I was in elementary school, she started making me clothes, buying me really abstract/unique pieces and sending them to me in a huge box a few weeks before school started. It was my favorite time of year because I knew there would not be a single person that had what I was going to wear. 

I always wanted to look different, and I never really worried about what anyone else thought of my clothes. (Side note: once I got to high school, I learned that my friends also looked forward to the first day of school because they couldn’t wait to see what I would wear! I call that a success!)

My summers were spent watching TLC’s “What Not to Wear.” I practically worshipped Stacy London and loved putting together looks for my friends and family. As I got older, I worked at both Buckle and Cache, allowing my love for fashion and fashion merchandising to grow.

My Fashion Philosophy

Now that I’m an adult, a wife and a mom in my 30s, my style has evolved and morphed into something I am really proud of. I’ve been cultivating and streamlining my preferences and philosophy for a while based on career, practicality and trend. 

A classy, simple look.

I live by the motto “Clothes make the man.” Obviously I don’t believe that material things are the most important, but what I wear is important to me. My clothes say “hello” before I do. Before I even introduce myself, shake your hand or hear your voice, what I’m wearing has already done the introduction and given you an impression of me, whether I like what it has to say or not. That’s why I pay close attention to what I put on for every occasion. 

My Closet

Here are some general rules of thumb for my style.

  • My clothes don’t have stains and rips.
  • Tears are strategically placed.
  • I use an iron and wear a belt.
  • My shoes are clean, and my socks always match.
  • I don’t show my bra straps, and
  • I DO NOT WEAR LEGGINGS IN PUBLIC.
  • I buy shoes that I can walk in.
  • I do not own a single pair of backless shoes, (save for Birkenstocks). 

I know, I know. This seems uptight.

I sound like I’m walking into a boardroom executive meeting. 

But hear me out. 

I like being prepared. I’d rather turn down a lunch meeting than show up looking like a slob. I want to make sure if I run into someone I know (or have the opportunity to meet someone of influence), I don’t look like I just rolled out of bed. 

Sporting a classic blue jean + white button down combo.

Living out this philosophy has made me feel confident in any setting. Even if I don’t know what is going on around me, I look the part.

But let’s be real. It’s not always glamorous. I’m sitting in a Starbucks in a sweater, ripped jeans and high top Converse.

But still, what I am wearing today is comfortable to me. I feel confident and put together.

My Style Evolution: Classic, with a Twist of Lime

I like to say that I peaked in the age of emo. (Funny how music plays into fashion choices.) I played the bass guitar, listened to Evanescence and wore the thickest black eyeliner. I’d call myself a rocker, but deep down my love for a clean, classic look was always present. 

I have since called myself a mixture of Joan Jett, Kate Spade and a little Jackie O. Classic, with a twist of lime.

Grunge chic.

I love a good band tee, shredded jeans and Docs, but in the same breath, I’ll take an empire-waist, knee-length, sleeveless silk dress and pair it with stilettos. 

I would not necessarily say that I’m a trendy person. I like what I like and don’t really care if it’s on trend, goes with the Pantone color of the year, or if it was on runways during Fashion Week. I like pieces that will last a long time. Tried and true shapes and colors.

Sleek and stylish.

I’m a sucker for a white button up and crisp jeans with loafers or pumps. I tuck almost everything in. I like to mix textures. I love feminine and masculine paired. 

I have lived in Washington State for the last 8 years. The culture shock was real. I came to the state with flare, super low-rise jeans and Birkenstocks. When I looked around and saw every single female (maybe even male) with black leggings, t-shirts and flannels around the waist, paired with Doc Marten’s and a beanie, I went right back to my high school days. It was comfortable for me in more ways than one, but not “me”. When we would visit Tennessee, people would stare at us. I could just hear their eyes say “Y’all ain’t from ‘round here, are ya.” And I wanted to say “Yes, ma’am, we are. We just found another way!” 

I grew out of that phase really quickly. Almost immediately actually. My first Easter here, everyone wore black and jeans. It was then that I realized I couldn’t just conform to this fashionably laid back society. My Southern roots were still there.

The following Easter, I wore a green dress from the Limited and our little family of 3 was matching.

Picture perfect. 


To see more of Reagan’s style, visit her Instagram @reagan.perritte.

Be sure to subscribe to see more from this series! Looking forward to sharing these stories with you all.

The Side of Paris Fashion Week No One Talks About

The Side of Paris Fashion Week No One Talks About

Strolling through the streets of Paris with my Starbucks in hand, I felt extremely American. In my defense, I knew it was only my first coffee stop of the day. I made my way to the metro station, grabbed a seat and waited for my stop.

Upon walking back up to ground level, the grey Parisian sky was waiting for me. And so was the Champs-Élysées. I strolled down the street, gawking at all the luxurious shops and ran right into Fenty’s pop up shop in the Galaries Lafayette.

A quick walk through the park led me to the Grand Palais, where I saw my first fashion show ever. The photographers were lined up on the sidewalks to capture all the ultra glamorous people wearing giant sunglasses, half of whom I did not recognize at all. They all had one thing in common though: these gorgeous people strolled perfectly through the bustle of the photographers directly into the Elie Saab exposition. The music started. The show began.

After being dazzled by all the beauty I witnessed, it was time to make an essential stop at the Café de Flore. We walked in and sat down.

More Instagram influencers. I didn’t think it was possible to see so many chic people.

My friends and I sat and discussed whether the fashion industry is truly superficial or not. After all, these Instagrammers aren’t really… doing anything. They’re just here. Taking selfies and tons of pictures (in outfits that are, admittedly, super cute).

Are they following trends or are they creating them?

Who actually is creating the trends?

Do the designers and runways shows have control of the fashion world in 2019?

We dipped into a small cobblestone alley because we were tired of walking through crowds of tourists and photographers. At that moment, a Parisian woman walked by me–sunglasses on and purse in hand.

An everyday woman, yet still great style. I could totally recreate that outfit. I turn toward my friends, “All these French women own a pair of jeans that fit them just right and a great blazer. That’s really all you need.”

Maybe these are the people who create what’s new.

The everyday people. The ordinary people. I don’t know about you, but most of my outfit inspiration comes from people I see on the streets.

Sure, huge fashion houses and designers still have an obvious sway in the trends. But I think it’s becoming more common to draw inspiration from one another simply as human beings.

And I love that.


What were your favorite PFW looks? Comment below and I’ll share all my faves!
(Featured photo from Unsplash.)

What Fashion Month Looks like in the Age of Instagram

What Fashion Month Looks like in the Age of Instagram

You’ve seen it everywhere. Bella Hadid or Kaia Gerber snapping selfies in their runways looks. Vogue’s fancy 5 minute makeup tutorials with models like Winnie Harlow or Rosie Huntington-Whiteley. And we can’t forget Rihanna’s Savage X Fenty performance that went viral.

It’s pretty obvious that Fashion Week is in flux. It’s changing and morphing to match the current social media-crazed culture. Just searching the hashtag #FashionWeek on Instagram brings up 20.6 million posts.

So, what does that mean for the industry as a whole? One recent development is the inclusion of many freelance writers and bloggers who are now getting the chance to attend these high profile events–an opportunity not many had before the Internet.

This year, I had the privilege of chatting with two journalists/media communication professionals who attended New York Fashion Week.

Amanda Randone

Amanda Randone is a journalist, New Yorker and fellow French speaker. She was also formerly the editorial manager at Barney’s New York and a regular contributor to Refinery29, Cosmopolitan.com and Coveteur.

Briefly tell me how you got started going to fashion weeks. What was your inspiration? How long have you been attending?

“Believe it or not, I started attending shows at New York Fashion Week seven years ago when I was in college! Which I thought was simply the coolest thing in the world (it was). I was representing the NYU school newspaper, the Washington Square News, where we managed to land invites to higher-profile shows like Badgley Mischka, Lela Rose, and Rebecca Minkoff. I even covered a party hosted by the legendary Patricia Fields (also an NYU alumna!).

This exposure to the fashion world was thrilling, and I loved channelling the creative energy I witnessed on the runway into my own writing. The whole experience helped me envision what a future in fashion journalism would look like, and I knew it was a path I wanted to pursue professionally.”

What were your favorite shows this year?

“I was utterly inspired by the Burnett New York Spring 2020 show this season. A very talented friend of mine is a cofounder of the label, which is still in its industry infancy. Having a personal connection to the talent behind the collection–especially when the brand is so authentically committed to empowering women—and watching their vision materialize in all its beaded, vibrant glory gave new meaning to the whole experience. Plus, the venue was the sun-drenched Elizabeth Street Garden, a dreamy garden oasis tucked away in Nolita. It was the perfect Sunday afternoon.”

What trends did you see the most of? What do you think will actually hit the streets this fall and winter?

“I was definitely seeing geometric sleeves (a good example is the strong circularity around the arms of a few Maria Cornejo looks that were unforgettable… examples here and here).

I also can’t get my mind off of two-toned pants and dresses à la Cynthia Rowley and Dima Ayad (Dima is actually a Dubai-based designer who’s showing in Paris, but here’s a sneak peek of her take on the trend). And there were a few billowing shirt/dresses styled over pants, see Brandon Maxwell and Rosie Assoulin for reference!”

What advice would you give to someone wanting to pursue fashion journalism?

“Write your heart out! And read trade journals like WWD to better understand the business behind the fashion. It’s an ever-evolving industry, and there are a lot of brands doing innovative things that’ll inspire you to think differently about how retailers hope to further engage with their customers (aka, your readers).

I also think it’s important to understand the major challenges facing media companies today. Get your feet wet with all things digital so you can dive into your first position well versed in SEO, e-commerce partnerships, and data analytics.”

Where can we find updates about you/your media company/your experiences as a journalist?

“I update the selected clips section of my website regularly, which is also where you’ll find the reporting I do outside of fashion (I cover women’s issues and write a lot about Islam, examples here and here!). My thoughts are occasionally on Twitter, and my looks/family/friends are often on Instagram.”

Hannah D’Avanzo

Hannah D’Avanzo is a journalist and founder of HD Access Media. She also happens to be someone I met (and became friends with) in college.

Briefly tell me how you got started going to fashion weeks. What was your inspiration? How long have you been attending?

“I was promised an interview with Jason [Derulo] during Fall Fashion Week of 2017, which was the start of my attendance for fashion weeks. Since then, I have attended Milan Fashion Week, Rome Fashion Week, New York Winter Fashion Week, and this past New York Fall Fashion. People have always inspired me. Everyone has a story to tell, and I became addicted to learning and hearing from others. Creators in particular inspire me because there is always a story behind their clothes and designs. I love a good story.”

What were your favorite shows this year?

“My favorite show this year was Cynthia Rowley.  Cynthia held her show outside which was a nice change from being indoors at shows all day. She had the most fun, summery outdoor theme. Some models even carried surf boards and wore bright colored clothing. I also liked that Cynthia featured one model that was much older and shorter than everyone else. This left me wondering, ‘What the story was behind the older model and who was she?’

I also enjoyed Bibhu Mohapatra’s show because he featured beautiful gowns that displayed his vibrant Indian culture. I’m also obsessed with sequins and details, and each of his gowns were beautifully embellished. I was so thrilled to get an interview with him!”

What trends did you see the most of? What do you think will actually hit the streets this fall and winter?

“Though all the shows were very different, I saw a lot of pieces featuring shades of mustard, orange and dark turquoise on clothing. I noticed lots of models on the runway wearing leather throughout the show. This did not only include black leather but all different muted colors on leather. I would not be surprised to see lots of leather trends in the near future.”

What advice would you give to someone wanting to pursue fashion journalism?

“Stay up to date with trends. Dress the part you want to play ahead of time because the industry can be very superficial. I’d also say be friendly and get acquainted with publicists. Ultimately, they control everything and know everyone. I’ve had many publicists help me beyond measures. Just this fashion week I was able to watch a show backstage with the designer himself because of a publicist I talked to right when entering the show. I’ve also had many publicists tell me no and brush me off. Though this has happened on several occasions, I’d always recommend reaching out to publicists. This could potentially help further you in the industry.”

Where can we find updates about you/your media company/your experiences as a journalist?

“On my Instagram @hannahdavanzo or website www.hdaccessmedia.com.”


What have been your favorite Fashion Month looks so far? Leave a comment below! Also, follow this blog for more updates about upcoming fashion weeks.


P.S. If you’re looking for more information on London Fashion Week, I’d suggest starting with this article by Man Repeller.

For the styles at Milan Fashion Week, check out Refinery 29’s recap. Oh, and this video of J. Lo sporting the iconic dress that literally launched Google Images.

USA brand brings European style to the West Coast

USA brand brings European style to the West Coast

If you look at her Instagram, you might think she’s a travel blogger. But she’s actually at every fashion week to get inspiration for her newest collections. From Portugal to Paris, fashion designer Brittany Correy is always on-the-go.

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Correy is the name and face behind the lady & the sailor, a simple clothing collection based on a solid fashion philosophy. “Good basics are the foundation to creating beautifully uncomplicated style.” With three boutiques in L.A., her brand is bringing European fashion to the U.S. one classic piece at a time. 

How did you become interested in fashion?

“I wouldn’t say there was one pivotal moment. I come from creative roots; that was my upbringing, art. It was just the natural progression. Fashion is just a daily form of art to me. It’s unique to the person. Each day you choose colors and textures. It’s like everyday you wake up and say, “Who am I today?” Such a fun form of expression.”

How did you start the lady & the sailor?

“With a set of ideas and long hours! I built the idea for the collection initially on my need for certain things. I would get dressed and feel like I was missing certain “building pieces.” For example, a tee refined enough to wear to a nice dinner. Or a tank long enough to layer under a specific sweater. The brand was built on the five pieces I always thought I was missing to complete an outfit.”

How would you describe your brand?

“Feminine with a nod to boy.”

What’s your favorite accessory?

“Hands down my favorite vintage Levis! I wear them endlessly, and they seem to fit the bill for almost any occasion in LA. Daytime with a sweatshirt or striped tee. Nighttime with a perfect leather jacket, black tee and heels.”

What’s a typical day like for you?

“I usually start my day at the office and check in with the 3 boutiques. Once they are all situated, I move on to design and production. There’s daily design, playing with color palettes and fabrics. And then fittings several times a week. Fashion moves fast; there’s never down time.”

What are some of your favorite hobbies?

“All my favorite hobbies are not fashion related. This business is so consuming for me, when I get free time, truly the last thing I want to do is fashion related. Sometimes I need to rest my mind so I can be inspired when it counts. I love travel, yoga and it sounds crazy, but organizing! There’s nothing more enjoyable for me than a quiet evening at home organizing my closet or bathroom drawers.”

What inspires you?

“Travel, always. I can’t get enough. I love to see what people are wearing, men and women both. There’s also so much inspiration found in cityscapes, food, everything. I was in St. Tropez this summer and came across this incredible street of pink buildings: each had a different color trim. I wrote down every color combo there was!”

What’s it like constantly traveling? Are there things from home you miss while you are gone?

“First and foremost, my French bulldog, Clyde. After a day, I miss him so much it hurts! Then, of course, my husband and my family. Then it’s the little things, like my favorite coffee and my bed. Also just the luxury of having down time between travels. There’s nothing better than being home on a Saturday afternoon with literally nothing to do. No deadlines, no pressure. It’s the best feeling in the world.”

What tops your bucket list?

“I wouldn’t say it’s a single destination or experience. Rather, I would love to get to a place in the future where I could spend a full summer abroad. Relocate for May or June until August. I’d pick a place that I find the most inspiring at the time. I’d spend the summer absorbing the culture and then of course designing and sourcing. The summer would culminate with shooting our spring campaign, which we shoot every August. It’s our biggest and most important lookbook of the year. The campaign would likely be inspired by my summer.”

What do you hope to accomplish in the next year?

“I’ve always envisioned the lady & the sailor as a lifestyle brand, comprised of more than just clothing. We’re currently working on branching into accessories, bags, shoes and things of that nature. During my travels, I’ve seen so many beautiful things made by international artisans! There’s so many of these things I’d like to infuse into this realm of the brand.”

 

To shop, visit the website.

Photos courtesy of Brittany.

 

Fashion Flashback: ’90s Sitcom Edition

Fashion Flashback: ’90s Sitcom Edition

Happy Friday et joyeux 14 juillet à tous!!! 🇫🇷

The end of another week means the beginning of another fashion flashback post. Today we are exploring the wonderfully bizarre decade known as the 1990s.

Ahhh, the ’90s. Since the turn of the century, people have been reminiscing on the nostalgic beauty (and horror) of the 1990s.

The style of the ’90s is definitely in a category of its own. From Friends to Fresh Prince, the style encapsulated in the classic 90s sitcoms is enduring even today. While each one of these TV series could realistically have their own separate blog post, I am going to attempt to briefly show you a few of my favorite ’90s sitcom looks.

  1. Saved by the Bell
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    I am not even lying when I said I spent my entire freshman year of high school trying to be Kelly Kapowski. And I constantly crushed over Zack Morris (yes, I know it’s kind of weird if you think about it. I mean, he’s like 25 years older than me). When it comes to the crazy fashion of this even crazier TV series, all of them have a distinct yet somehow relatable style. Whether it’s Kelly’s matching floral pieces, Jessie doubling up on denim, or Slater’s muscle shirts, there is something everyone can enjoy.

  2. Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
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    Just hearing the name of this show makes me want to sing the theme song. Not only is the show itself so amazing, but it also has some great fashion cameos. See: Carlton’s preppy cardigans and plaid shorts, Will’s patterned everything outfits, and Hillary’s blazers with absolutely gigantic shoulder pads.
  3. The Nanny
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    Even if you had never before watched this show (and I’ll admit, I hardly have), you will automatically recognize two things about The Nanny: Fran Drescher’s distinct voice and absurd outfits. Yet somehow I’m still insanely jealous of her wardrobe.
  4. Full House
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    What. A. Classic. This show has such a variety of stereotypical 90s looks! I mean, really, the list goes on and on. DJ and Stephanie Tanner kept up the trend of floral and denim everything. Kimmy Gibbler made sure that scrunchies didn’t go out of style. Uncle Jesse was the cool (and extremely good-looking) uncle. Danny Tanner is, like, the ultimate dad. He has the dad jeans, the dad hair, and the dad jokes. And, like all other ’90s babies, Michelle rocked those overalls.

  5. Seinfeld
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    By far one of the funniest/best sitcoms ever made, Seinfeld definitely has some iconic fashion moments, including Kramer’s weird button up shirts and Jerry sporting all the Nike merchandise. Truth be told, Elaine Benes is actually one of my style icons. Her persona is so business casual/cool (maybe it’s just wishful thinking that I can pull off blazers with shoulder pads).

  6. F.R.I.E.N.D.S.
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    It’s no secret that the F.R.I.E.N.D.S. craze has been vamped up yet again with all the ’00s babies now watching it on Netflix. I can’t deny that I’m super jealous of how well Rachel and Monica pull off those mom jeans. I pretty much want their wardrobes. Even Ross has some killer looks in this series! And don’t get me started on the weird matching cast photos. This show is honestly probably one of the most well-known sitcoms ever, and it’s style is just a reflection of how iconic it was.

I hope you enjoyed seeing some of my favorite looks from such an interesting era in TV history. So tell me, what are YOUR favorite ’90s sitcom looks? Are there any that aren’t on this list? I’d love to hear about it in the comments below!

KV